2009 Ford Mustang Owner's Manual

Ford Mustang Cell phone use
The use of Mobile Communications Equipment has become increasingly important in the conduct of business and personal affairs. However, drivers must not compromise their own or others’ safety when using such equipment. Mobile Communications can enhance personal safety and security when appropriately used, particularly in emergency situations. Safety must be paramount when using mobile communications equipment to avoid negating these benefits. Mobile Communication Equipment includes, but is not limited to cellular phones, pagers, portable email devices, in-vehicle communications systems, telematics devices and portable two-way radios.

Ford Mustang Vehicle sensitive mode
Ford Mustang Owner's Manual This is the normal retractor mode, which allows free shoulder belt length adjustment to your movements and locking in response to vehicle movement. For example, if the driver brakes suddenly or turns a corner sharply, or the vehicle receives an impact of approximately 5 mph (8 km/h) or more, the combination safety belts will lock to help reduce forward movement of the driver and passengers.

When to use the automatic locking mode
2009 Ford Mustang In this mode, the shoulder belt is automatically pre-locked. The belt will still retract to remove any slack in the shoulder belt. The automatic locking mode is not available on the driver safety belt. This mode should be used any time a child safety seat is installed (except a booster) in a passenger front or outboard rear seating position. Children 12 years old and under should be properly restrained in the rear seat whenever possible. Refer to Safety restraints for children or Safety seats for children later in this chapter.

How does the airbag supplemental restraint system work?
The airbag SRS is designed to activate when the vehicle sustains a longitudinal deceleration sufficient to cause the airbag sensors to close an electrical circuit that initiates airbag inflation. The fact that the airbags did not inflate in a collision does not mean that something is wrong with the system. Rather, it means the forces were not sufficient enough to cause activation. Airbags are designed to inflate in frontal and near-frontal collisions, not rollover, side-impact, or rear-impacts unless the collision causes sufficient longitudinal deceleration.

Front passenger sensing system
The front passenger sensing system is designed to meet the regulatory requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 208 and is designed to disable (will not inflate) the front passenger’s frontal airbag under certain conditions. The front passenger sensing system works with sensors that are part of the front passenger’s seat and safety belt. The sensors are designed to detect the presence of a properly seated occupant and determine if the front passenger’s frontal airbag should be enabled (may inflate) or disabled (will not inflate).

U.S. DOT Tire Identification Number (TIN)
Both U.S. and Canada Federal regulations require tire manufacturers to place standardized information on the sidewall of all tires. This information identifies and describes the fundamental characteristics of the tire and also provides a U.S. DOT Tire Identification Number for safety standard certification and in case of a recall.

This begins with the letters “DOT” and indicates that the tire meets all federal standards. The next two numbers or letters are the plant code designating where it was manufactured, the next two are the tire size code and the last four numbers represent the week and year the tire was built. For example, the numbers 317 mean the 31st week of 1997. After 2000 the numbers go to four digits. For example, 2501 means the 25th week of 2001. The numbers in between are identification codes used for traceability. This information is used to contact customers if a tire defect requires a recall.

Ford Mustang 2009 Owner's Manual

Ford Mustang 2009 Owner's Manual For Free

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